Teaching English in a Foreign Country

posted in: Europe | 54

Happy Sunday! I wanted to remind everyone to check out my stock photo selections, mainly because I just want to share them with you. But if you need stock images for brochures or what have you, look at these pix with an eye to buy. Thanks!

Also, my good friend Cyndie Smith and I sponsor a Yahoo group called I Do Street Art – International Games of Tag, which is devoted to graffiti pictures. Take a look at what we two have shot and posted. Also, it’s open to the public so anyone – even you! – can post his or her own photos of street art. Another blog I maintain with my good friend and fellow photographer Paula Showen (you REALLY MUST see her work!) is Image/Imagine. We challenge each other each month with themes we each interpret according to our own photo style. Check it out and leave us a comment! Check these three sites often because they are added to on a regular basis. I actually had this particular blog post scheduled for my last installment, but a last-minute invitation to the Heckenwirtschaft changed all that. But here’s a photo I shot last Sunday morning of the local marching band parading down the street once again in front of my apartment. I think it was First Communion at the church or something. But spring is here and the weather is getting warmer, so I know I’ll be hearing that oompah music pretty often til fall. In addition, this year is the 1000-year anniversary of this little village, so I’m sure they have extra fests planned this year. And I’m also sure you’ll be seeing photos of all the goings-on.  

Other than that, I have very few photos to show you this week. However, I thought I would give you glimpse into what it’s like to teach English as a Second Language (ESL) in a foreign country. That’s how I pay most of my bills here in Germany, with a little pocket change coming from freelance articles for online magazines. read more

Visitors from the New World – Part 1

posted in: Europe | 0
In my last post I told you that I would be taking a three-week break because some friends were coming to visit me here in Bamberg, Germany, where I live and teach English. Well, it’s been four weeks, so I hope you’re still reading. The three-week break took care of the visitors, but I guess I needed another week to settle into a new teaching job and recover from my visitors’ vacations! So, I’m back. In this post you’ll see just what me and my visitors were up to for those three glorious weeks. BTW, one visitor was my lovely husband James and the other two were Cyndie and Bram Smith, good friends of ours from Florida. Cyndie is a talented metal-jewelry artist I met while I was director at the art gallery there. They all arrived on the same flight in late September, which made the hook-up easy, and I met them at Munich’s main train station. I’d taken the train in from Bamberg and they had taken the train from the airport. Then we all made our way to Marienplatz to see the Glockenspiel and have Weisswurst and beer for breakfast. Here’s a shot of Bram (the back of the head closest to my lens) watching the Glockenspiel, but mostly giggling with me about the combover of the guy in the red shirt in front of us! Here’s the back of Cyndie’s head (long
hair, on the right) as she takes a picture of the Glockenspiel in action.
And here’s James enjoying a wonderful Oktoberfest beer along
with his Weisswurst
.
Because Weisswurst translates literally as “white sausage” and because they are
actually white in color, Cyndy dubbed them “White Weenies.”

Since I am lucky enough to have seen
the Glockenspiel many times, it’s my special pleasure to watch the crowd watch
the Glock. I get great people shots from this. Here’s one of a “living tripod”
who looks like she’s used to filling this role for the photographer behind her.

We ventured around the corner to the wonderful
Viktualienmarkt where, among all the luscious fruits, vegetables, cheese,
wine and beer, we saw artichokes that had bloomed. This is what they look like
if you don’t pick them while you can still eat them.
read more

German Labor Day – May 1st

posted in: Europe, Germany | 2

Germany’s (all of Europe, in fact) equivalent of Labor Day: May 1st. Banks and most businesses are closed, including the supermarkets. However, cafes, bistros, restaurants and especially beer gardens are in full swing. See my photos of Bamberg's samba band and speech event plus join me for a famous Rauchbier (smoke beer).